reading while traveling

books-1163695_640Apparently this is a thing I like to do: read a book set in the place I’m traveling to.

Right now, I’m heading off to a weekend in Acadia, Maine, and I’m reading The Stranger in the Woods by Michael Finkel, about a man who lived as a hermit in the backwoods of Maine for nearly 30 years.

When I went to Iceland, I read a book called Boy on the Edge by Fridrick Erlings, about a foster kid growing up in Iceland – I could look outside and understand the descriptions of the lava fields in a way I probably couldn’t have if I hadn’t been right there.

When I went on a road trip after college, I read Jack Kerouac’s On the Road and Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild.  I also read, as we drove through the southwestern states, a terrible book by Bentley Little called The Revelation, which took place in Arizona.

These were all nearly coincidences – I requested Stranger in the Woods a while back and only now just got it.  And I had Boy on my Overdrive Wish List, and it just happened to be available as I was loading up my Nook for the trip.  Most of my road trip novels were ones I took with me, so I did choose them with the trip in mind, but The Revelation was found somewhere along the way.  More loosely, when I did a semester in Italy, I picked up a copy of Alex Garland’s The Beach in an English bookstore – it wasn’t about Italy, but the traveling aspect was there.  And the movie was released in Italy at around the same time.

This summer I’m heading over to Ireland, and I would love to read something set there.  Of course, I’ve already read The Dubliners.  Any suggestions?  Otherwise I’ll just hope that a magical coincidence will bring me a good Irish-themed book just in time… or that we’ll find an Irish bookshop to visit there…

3 on a theme: living houses

I am often reading between 3 and 5 books at the same time, and occasionally there’s a theme that might not be remarkable in one book… but when I see it in three books, I take notice.

It’s a common trope, the haunted house.  But not so common when the house becomes its own character…

livinghouses

All read between October 2016 – May 2017

And the Trees Crept In reminded me a lot of House of Leaves, and both books could be on this list.  Even more so than House of Leaves, And the Trees Crept In treated the house like a character.  It also treated the trees like their own character, so it felt everything around the main character was creeping in on her in some threatening way, and feels very much alive.

The Woman in the Wall is about a young girl who feels invisible and disappears into the walls of her house.  She builds intricate tunnels so that she can move about unnoticed, walls off rooms for herself and spirits away food and sewing supplies to make clothing for her family.  The whole novel had a sense of magical realism, and it was clear that members of her family had forgotten about her and thought of the house as being alive.

The final book on this list was the one that got me remembering just how many other stories I had read about houses that felt alive.  In this case, the house in The House IS alive, brought to life by a misplaced spell, and it has raised a child up to be a boy… and it isn’t very happy when a girl comes along and tries to steal him away.

Have you read a book that fits this theme?  Tell me about it in the comments!

when bookworms get earworms

The first book that ever really got a song stuck in my head was If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth.  The title is taken from a Wings song, “Band on the Run.”  If you didn’t know, reading the book would tell you that Wings was a project of Paul McCartney’s after The Beatles, and the main character Lewis is pretty much obsessed with them and with music in general, although his story is happening in the 70s and so he can’t just download them.  Anyway, everytime I looked at this book’s cover, the song started playing in my head…

It seemed to be a bit of a trend that year, as I came across I Think I Love You by Allison Pearson.  Never actually read the book, because every time I saw this book in the library it was full on David Cassidy and the Partridge Family and I just couldn’t do it.

So, of course, I’ll include the song below so you can have it stuck in your head, too.

After that point, I had songs on the brain every time I saw a book title.  That’s the only way I can explain why every time I saw the cover for Through the Ever Night by Veronica Rossi, I got Metallica’s “Through the Never” stuck in my head.

Twisting

turning

through the

Ever Night!

Thankfully, I stopped getting songs stuck in my head so regularly.  But recently it’s come back.  I blame the advanced reader copy I received of Bad Blood by Demitria Lunetta.  Of course.  Taylor Swift.  You KNOW that’s going to get stuck in your head.  ‘Cuz baby now we’ve got bad blood…

And then, while I was reading Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, I couldn’t stop hearing Blondie’s “Heart of Glass.”

And then another Taylor Swift song swooped in while I was reading After the Woods by Kim Savage.  Are we out of the woods yet? Are we out of the woods yet? Are we out of the woods yet? Are we out of the woods? Are we in the clear yet? Are we in the clear yet? Are we in the clear yet? In the clear yet? Good.

It comes to a point where I’m relieved to finish one of these books, just so I can get the damned song out of my head.

What books have given you an earworm?