August reading round-up

  • # of books read: 11
  • audiobooks listened to: 2
  • OwlCrate books read: 2
  • total page count: 2,689
  • year total page count: 31,563

This month I dedicated myself to making a dent in my Owlcrate books as well as the haul from the Book Barn.  It was a busy month, and I didn’t get as much reading done as I would have liked.

First up was The Upside of Unrequited, which as you can see I unboxed back in April.  I’ve been wanting to read this since it came out, because I really loved Simon vs. the Homosapien Agenda.  This was more of a typical teen romance – the main couple was straight, but almost all of the minor characters were not.  There was a lot more sister drama and the pain of losing best friends to boyfriends/girlfriends.  Overall it was enjoyable and fun, perfect for summer.  (Plus it takes place in the summer, so there’s that!).

Eliza and Her Monsters was, apparently, the one OwlCrate I haven’t Instagrammed, but I really enjoyed it.  I think, partially, because it reminded me so much of Fangirl, which I loved – and because I’m in a bit of a fanfiction-writing phase again (*sigh*) I totally understood where Eliza was at.

I’m amazed that I’ve read 5 of the 9 pictured in this stack!  A Curious Tale of the In-Between was one I put on my Goodreads TBR list a while back and ended up buying on Thriftbooks.  I wanted to read it to give away this summer as a prize (I had some swag from BEA given to me that ties in) but that didn’t happen… The book was a bit darker than I expected but still managed to stay fairly light.

Book haul from my trip to the Book Barn #tbr #bookstagram #bookhaul #vintageya #usedbooks

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Well, I read The Lie and the Forbidden Game trilogy last month.  This month I continued to pare down this stack by reading Season of Ponies and Saving Max.  Saving Max was a decent, if slightly implausible, thriller.  But Season of Ponies!  Let me tell you, I have been looking for this book since fifth grade.  It’s out of print, and I’ve never been a member of a library that owned it, and used copies online are usually unavailable or cost far too much.  I suppose I could have requested it through interlibrary loan but what a hassle, when I found it at the Book Barn for $1!  This book brought me straight back to my childhood.  It’s such a simple story, but I loved it.  I was such a Zilpha Keatley Snyder fangirl back in the day (and clearly, a little bit now).

I couldn’t believe it when I saw this in my library’s Wowbrary newletter.  A new book by Michael Crichton?  Hasn’t he been dead for ten years?  And it looks just like Jurassic Park??  Dragon Teeth was much different, sort of a Wild West dino hunter vibe (Jurassic Park meets Westworld?), and it felt a bit like a bare bones first draft, but hey, it’s summer and fun, fast reads are what I like!

  • Best Overall: Eliza and Her Monsters
  • Worst Overall: Saving Max
  • Fastest Read: Season of Ponies (1 day)
  • Slowest Read: The Wood (25 days)
  • Best Audio: You

 

The full list:

  1. The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli
  2. A Curious Tale of the In-Between by Lauren DeStefano
  3. The Last Star (5th Wave #3) by Rick Yancey (audiobook)
  4. Dragon Teeth by Michael Crichton
  5. Season of Ponies by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
  6. Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia
  7. Saving Max by Antoinette van Heugten
  8. You by Caroline Kepnes (audiobook)
  9. Crystal Storm (Falling Kingdoms #5) by Morgan Rhodes
  10. The Wood by Chelsea Bobulski
  11. The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders by Anthony Flacco with Jerry Clark
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July reading round-up

  • # of books read: 15
  • audiobooks listened to: 3
  • graphic novels read: 2
  • total page count: 4,402
  • year total page count: 28,874

This was a crazy month, and despite having a week of vacation, it wasn’t exactly *restful* vacation.  Plus with all the running around for the summer reading program at my library, and planning for the trip, I didn’t get as much reading in as I would have liked.

Chapter one… #empireofstorms #sarahjmaas #currentlyreading #bookstagram

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After waiting for what seemed like forever for the ebook of Empire of Storms to come in, I broke down and checked out the physical book.  I hadn’t realized how small the font is in these books – it made me feel old!  The book design, however, is quite nice (as you can see from the chapter headings, above).  But I still read it in under 2 weeks.  I felt a bit like this world is becoming too unwieldy and I enjoyed many of the side characters’ stories more than Aelin’s, but I’m still looking forward to the next book in the series.  Maybe now I can move on and read A Court of Thorns and Roses

I ❤️vintage YA #bookstagram #ninetieskids #ilovethenineties

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I read a bunch of vintage YA this month, largely thanks to a visit to the infamous Book Barn in Niantic, CT.  First up was After the First Death by Robert Cormier, which was just as dark as any of his others I’ve read.  The plot sounded similiar to Ransom (aka Five Were Missing) by Lois Duncan – children on a school bus held captive.  In this case, however, the ransomers were Middle Eastern terrorists who were ready to kill all the children to make a political statement if their demands were not met.

In a stroke of luck I found the entire Forbidden Game trilogy by L.J. Smith.  Look at those amazing neon covers!  The fast pace of the books brought me right back to my teen years.  I read a few reviews of Caraval that compared it to The Forbidden Game, but so far I’m not seeing too much by way of similarities aside from a character named Julian and the fact that they are playing a game.

Book haul from my trip to the Book Barn #tbr #bookstagram #bookhaul #vintageya #usedbooks

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One book I managed to read during one flight was The Lie by C.L. Taylor.  The description on the back was vague enough – four friends go on what promises to be an amazing trip and turns into a nightmare – that I had no idea what was in store.  Didn’t expect any of it!  This is a great thriller for anyone who liked Girl on the Train or In a Dark, Dark Wood (in other words, you kinda wanted to slap the narrator, but also you wanted to race to the end).

In bookish news, I visited the Trinity College Library on my trip to Ireland and it was just as amazing as I dreamed it would be.

I listened to a bunch of audiobooks this month.  One was The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas and it was amazing, highly recommended! (I’ve been waiting months for the audio of this!).  The other two were duds I downloaded via AudiobookSYNC.  Beast by Donna Jo Napoli was another Beauty and the Beast remix and it was strange, to say the least (do I need to imagine the Beast as a lion, sniffing after the female lions?  Not really).  The other was Remember to Forget by Ashley Royer, a Wattpad fanfiction novel.  The premise was interesting but overall it was a bit boring.

I thought maybe I’d add a little superlatives list for my round-ups, so here goes…

  • Best Overall: The Hate U Give
  • Worst Overall: The Beast
  • Fastest Read: The Lie (under 6 hours)
  • Slowest Read: Empire of Storms (12 days)
  • Best Audio: The Hate U Give
  • Best Illustrations: Olympos

The full list:

  1. I Am a Hero book 1 by Kengo Hanazawa (graphic novel)
  2. Beast by Donna Jo Napoli (audiobook)
  3. After the First Death by Robert Cormier
  4. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (audiobook)
  5. Empire of Storms (Throne of Glass #5) by Sarah J. Maas
  6. Remember to Forget by Ashley Royer (audiobook)
  7. Olympos by Aki (graphic novel)
  8. Sextrap Dungeon by Kurt Knox
  9. The Hunter (The Forbidden Game #1) by L.J. Smith
  10. The Ghost Files by Apryl Baker
  11. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
  12. The Lie by C.L. Taylor
  13. The Chase (The Forbidden Game #2) by L.J. Smith
  14. The Kill (The Forbidden Game #3) by L.J. Smith
  15. An Illustrated History of Notable Shadowhunters and Denizens of Downworld by Cassandra Clare, illustrated by Cassandra Jean

June reading round-up

  • # of books read: 16
  • audiobooks listened to: 2
  • graphic novels read: 8
  • total page count: 4,395
  • year total page count: 24,472

A large portion of my month was spent reading 2 books by Cassandra Clare.

The first was Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy, which I picked up mainly because I’ve been meaning to read it for a while and because I found out I wasn’t first on hold for Lord of Shadows…  I wasn’t expecting this to be, essentially, a book about Simon.  It was sort of like The Bane Chronicles, a series of short stories, written by Clare, Maureen Johnson, Sarah Rees Brennan, and Robin Wasserman, that focused on Simon’s time spent learning Shadowhunter skills, trying to recover his memories, and dealing with not being a vampire anymore.  There were a few lovely Malec moments, and a very sad moment at the end that for me, overshadowed the death at the end of Lord of Shadows.

I’m glad I read Tales before I read Lord of Shadows, simply because of some of the background, a reminder that Alec and Magnus now have children and to meet some of the Shadowhunters who appear as part of the Centurions.  There are many romances going on in Lord of Shadows, but my favorite relationship was between Kit and Ty.  I feel like in my review of Lady Midnight I didn’t even mention Kit, even though he was one of my favorite characters, because he wasn’t essential to the complex plot.  But here he was featured more, and I can’t wait to see what happens.  Two more years till the next book…

After these two tomes, I was ready for a huge graphic novel binge.

A few blog posts helped me discover a load of new graphic novels.  This one recommended the memoir Imagine Wanting Only This, and this one introduced me to Giant Days.  I swear there was a blog post that recommended Ten Count and The Angel of Elhamburg by Aki but unfortunately I can’t find it.  Ten Count has been highly enjoyable, so much so that I bought v. 2 and couldn’t wait for volume 3 to arrive and starting reading online.  My library director got an ARC of Lighter Than My Shadow, an intense memoir of a young woman with an eating disorder.

This month I also finished two books from Wattpad that have been published.  The first was a horse-related story called Born to Run which I enjoyed because it felt like a mash-up between Thoroughbred and Wildfire.  The second was The Casquette Girls, which I started reading on Wattpad and ending up buying, as Wattpad isn’t the easiest way to read and the book is over 500 pages.  I really loved Casquette Girls – if you’re looking for something with amazing world-building and some paranormal romance, this is it.

Sarah Dessen’s new book came out this month, which I was thrilled about.  While it followed the Sarah Dessen formula, it’s still a great summer read.

Into the Water was another new release I’ve been looking forward to, since I loved The Girl on the Train.  Unfortunately I found the issues I had with Hawkins’ first book (confusing multiple narrators) were even worse in this book, while this was also less of a thriller.  The mystery was interesting, and the story got better as it went along, but still a little disappointing.

With my trip to Ireland coming up next month, I’ll either read way more because I’m traveling, or read way less (sometimes vacations are too busy for reading!).  But I do have another stack of graphic novels to read, and about 4 OwlCrate books I need to get to, plus I’m going on a pilgrimage to the Book Barn in Niantic, CT tomorrow, so I’ll be sure to have a haul from that 🙂  The TBR list never stops growing!

The complete list of all the books I read this month (links take you to my Goodreads reviews)

  1. Born to Run (North Oak #1) by Ann Hunter (via Wattpad)
  2. The Voices by F.R. Tallis (audiobook)
  3. Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy by Cassandra Clare et al.
  4. Torso by Brian Michael Bendis (graphic novel)
  5. Lighter Than My Shadow by Katie Green (graphic novel)
  6. Torso by Brian Michael Bendis (graphic novel)
  7. Of Beast and Beauty by Stacey Jay (audiobook)
  8. Lord of Shadows (The Dark Artifices #2) by Cassandra Clare 
  9. Ten Count v. 2 by Rihito Takarai (graphic novel)
  10. Giant Days v. 1 by John Allison (graphic novel)
  11. Imagine Wanting Only This by Kristen Radtke (graphic novel)
  12. Ten Count v. 3 by Rihito Takarai (graphic novel)
  13. Once and For All by Sarah Dessen
  14. The Casquette Girls by Alys Arden
  15. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins
  16. The Angel of Elhamburg by Aki (graphic novel)

May reading round-up

  • # of books read: 21
  • audiobooks listened to: 5
  • ARCs read: 1
  • total page count: 4,538
  • year total page count: 20,077
I managed to get tons of reading done this month!  My favorite reads of the month were Bang by Barry Lyga (about a boy who shot and killed his younger sister when he was a toddler), Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty (a murder mystery set in space and involving clones), and Ten Count v. 1 (a manga that warmed my little yaoi heart).

I got through the top four books in this stack.  I enjoyed House quite a bit, though it was somehow completely different than I imagined.  Dissected was also pretty good!  I thought I would like The Last Final Girl and Tape better than I did, but hey – you can’t like everything.   All of these were super quick reads.  I got House and Tape via Thriftbooks (along with most of the others in this stack!) and the others I got at the library book sale.  Last year I only found one book at the book sale, so I was quite pleased with the selection this year.

The Revenge of Analog was an interesting look at how people, after several decades of movement toward a digital world, are gravitating toward the analog.  Whether it’s music on vinyl, film cameras, or simply handmade goods, I have seen this trend emerging both for myself (I own a typewriter again!) and among others of my generation.  Sure, it’s convenient to be able to load up my Nook for a trip, but sometimes it’s easier (simpler, and easier on the eyes!) to read a physical book.  I was thinking this was more of a hipster trend, but honestly I’m seeing this everywhere.

A nice day for beach reading #beachreads #sixwakes #bookstagram #murlafferty

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I’m not a big fan of sci-fi, but the horror elements of Six Wakes (“Six crew. One ship. One killer.”) intrigued me when this appeared at the library.  I also really liked the cover, because sometimes that’s how I judge books!  I had the opportunity to read One of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus as an ARC, and I enjoyed that murder mystery just as much.  Maybe I like murder mysteries now?

Because the weather has been far cooler than usual for May, I’ve been listening to audiobooks like mad (normally, I’d have my car window rolled down, which makes it hard to listen to an audiobook while driving).  My favorite audio of the month was definitely The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon.  It was a quirky kind of love story that takes place over the course of a day.  The alternating voices reminded me a little of Eleanor and Park – also the focus on music as a thing that brings the two together.  I also enjoyed Anna Kendrick’s memoir, Scrappy Little Nobody.

Three nonfiction books this month, WHAT?  I’ve had this on request for a while and it came in for me just as I was heading up to Acadia, Maine for the weekend.  It could not have been more perfect timing.  The Stranger in the Woods is the story of a man who lived alone and unnoticed in the Maine wilderness for TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS.  As the author of the book pointed out, most people don’t go more than a few hours without speaking to another human being.  Even me.  I enjoy my time alone, but I also have the outlet of talking to people via the internet, even if I don’t leave the house at all, which is rare.  Usually I at least go to the gym or grocery shopping.  So while it sounds lovely to be alone for so long, I’m sure not even I could do it.

The complete list!  (links take you to my Goodreads reviews)

  1. The House by Christina Lauren
  2. Day 21 (The 100 #2) by Kass Morgan (audiobook)
  3. I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid (ebook)
  4. Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll
  5. The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter by David Sax
  6. Dissected by Megan Bostic
  7. The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon (audiobook)
  8. Tape by Steve Camden
  9. The Last Final Girl by Stephen Graham Jones
  10. One of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus (ARC)
  11. The Grownup by Gillian Flynn
  12. Bang by Barry Lyga
  13. Insanity by Susan Vaught
  14. The Infinite Sea (The 5th Wave #2) by Rick Yancey (audiobook)
  15. The Gathering (Shadow House #1) by Dan Poblocki (audiobook)
  16. Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty
  17. Ten Count, Volume 1 by Rihito Takarai
  18. The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel
  19. Blood on My Hands by Todd Strasser
  20. Deadly Attraction (Nightmare Hall #3) by Diane Hoh
  21. Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick (audiobook)

March reading round-up

  • # of books read: 14
  • audiobooks listened to: 3
  • ebooks read: 3
  • books from the Throne of Glass series: 2
  • graphic novels: 3
  • total page count: 3,998
  • year total page count: 12,251

Well, I still haven’t beat that crazy reading streak I had in January.  It does seem that I’m reading roughly 4,000 pages a month, though, and I can attest that several of the books this month were really long (including one that will end up being in next month’s round-up).

Only 3 audiobooks this month.  The first was the YA novel Shallow Graves by Kali Wallace, which I enjoyed despite its unevenness.  The other two audiobooks were both similar in genre and tone: Paul Tremblay’s Disappearance at Devil’s Rock and Megan Abbott’s You Will Know Me.  Both dealt with mothers and the hidden lives of their teenagers.  Both were also interesting character studies as not much by way of action happened, but kept me hooked until the end.

Darkly amusing #bookstagram #thedinner #hermankoch #justfinished

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The Dinner was recommended to me by a friend, and it was both short and disturbing.  I enjoy disturbing.  This was the kind of real-world disturbing, a scenario showing how thin the masks of polite society are, and how easily people descend into violent depths.

One of my favorite reads this month was Silence Fallen by Patricia Briggs.  This series continues to keep me hooked on the complicated political world of supernatural creatures.  Of course, Mercy Thompson is one of the strongest female characters I’ve ever read, and this installment revolves around that reputation.  I finished off another series just today, the Experiment in Terror series by Karina Halle.  The final book, Dust to Dust, wrapped everything up nicely.  If you enjoy those ghost hunter shows, this series is for you.

I started watching “The Man in the High Castle” last month, and binge-watched both seasons.  The book doesn’t develop the characters quite so much as the show does, and is more about the randomness of possibility and choice rather than the concept of parallel universes, but it was a thought-provoking read. (I’ll have to include Girls on Fire in next month’s round-up, since I’m still only halfway through).

On the graphic novel front, I only read 3 and they were from the same series: Harrow County.  I had read volume 1 last spring and only now discovered that a.) there were 4 volumes out already and b.) my library consortium had them all!  These are kind of horror, but also strangely wholesome?  The main character Emmy is a witch, but she wants to use her powers to help people.  She also has a familiar in the shape of a boy’s skin that speaks to her, and an evil twin, and there are lots of “haints” around who are more than ready to do evil stuff.  (See what I mean about wholesome/horror?)

Two more books in the Throne of Glass series read this month: The Assassin’s Blade, a prequel which contains 5 novellas, and Heir of Fire, book 3.  It seems like each book in this series gets longer and longer… and Heir of Fire in particular felt long, more like a setup for a grand finale.  However, it’s still really good!  Only 2 books left to go…

Finally, I got around to reading Caraval, which I received via Owl Crate.  I was pretty psyched about this month’s theme, which was circus.  I was half-expecting to receive the book Freeks, which would have better fit the theme, but Caraval had its own charm.  It’s a fun read if you don’t take it too seriously.  It’s also a beautiful book, and receiving it through the mail with lots of luxurious little goodies fit the theme of the book.  I can’t wait for next month’s box!

I may decide to include a Wattpad reading round-up at some point in the future – but probably not next month, since I’ll be busy participating in Camp Nanowrimo and hopefully cranking out the third and final Wolf Point prequel!

What have you read this month that you enjoyed?

February reading round-up

  • # of books read: 17
  • audiobooks listened to: 3
  • ebooks read: 6
  • ARCs read: 2
  • books from the Throne of Glass series: 2
  • graphic novels: 4
  • total page count: 3,877
  • year total page count: 8,253

Well, not so many books read as last month, but a lot of that has to do with February being 3 days shorter than January, as well as the fact that I took a week off from work, which means less time commuting to listen to audiobooks.

I breezed through 2 advanced reader copies, one from Edelweiss Above the Treeline and one from Netgalley.  I had some issues with Reaper by Kyra Leigh, although it was still a fast read (mostly to do with the ending).  Bad Blood by Demitria Lunetta fit in well with my rewatch of the Outlander series.  It involves a history of Scottish witches using blood magic.  Reaper will be released in May and Bad Blood will be coming out next month.

In newer releases, I got to read Veronica Roth’s new book, Carve the Mark.  This wasn’t the easy read Divergent was, and for a while in the beginning I thought I wasn’t going to be able to finish.  A few chapters later, once I hit Cyra’s point of view, all that changed.  Akos and Cyra’s slow burn relationship was quite enjoyable to read, so much so that I can almost forgive the fact that this ends without really wrapping up ANYTHING.

I also got my hands on History of Wolves, by Emily Fridlund, which has been on the hold shelves at my library for months.  It wasn’t quite as thriller-y as the jacket blurb makes it out to be, but the tension throughout and the descriptive passages made this a worthwhile read.

The graphic novels I read this month can be split quite evenly into Awesome and Pretty Good.  In the Pretty Good category: The Monstress is an award-winner, and has gorgeous artwork (the story itself is a bit too confusing and complex for me), and Trashed (by the author of My Friend Dahmer) was part memoir and part lecture on landfills.  In the Awesome category: Paper Girls 2 had all the greatness of the first volume, and Reindeer Boy by Cassandra Jean was cute as all hell.

In vintage YA, I discovered a horse series that I hadn’t read: Flambards, by K.M. Peyton.  It was delightfully old-fashioned, I suppose because it was written in 1967 and takes place in the early part of the century.  Since I would have to interlibrary loan the rest of the books, I attempted to watch the TV series, but that was really too old-fashioned for me.  Guess I’ll never find out if Christina marries William or Dick.

And finally, I finally read Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas (immdiately followed by Crown of Midnight) and I was a near-instant convert!  What took me so long??  In a way, I’m sort of glad I waited, because it means I get to read them all at once. Up next is the prequel, The Assassin’s Blade.

my top 10 werewolf books*

*that I didn’t write

Books about werewolves have a huge advantage over werewolf movies: they don’t have to deal with special effects, which means they can be great without needing a big budget.  That being said, there are a lot of cheesy werewolf books out there (and many of them are in the romance genre…).  This list includes both YA and adult novels.  

 

 

#10: Wolfbreed by S.A. Swann

6449596This book deserves a better cover.  I suppose here is where the idea of a budget affects werewolf novels in a similar way as movies.  This seems designed to appeal to fan of paranormal romance, but it’s actually more historical fiction or fantasy.

In the Middle Ages, an order of monks discovers a litter of werewolf pups, and kept them alive to use as weapons of God.  Years later, one of the weapons, Lilly, has escaped.  She’s found by Udolf, a man with one arm, who tries to help her.

I’ve read (or tried to read) other historical werewolf novels, and thus far Wolfbreed is unique for its time frame.

 

#9: Unleashed by Kristopher Reisz

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A gritty teen werewolf tale that broke away from the post-Twilight werewolf trend. The story is about more than changing into wolves and having superpowers – it’s about finding your voice rather than being a “hand-licker” or someone who tries to please other people.  If City of Bones by Cassandra Clare had more of a focus on werewolves, it might have made my list, but this novel has that same feel – the urban fantasy, about werewolves living in the city.

Fun fact, I named one of the werewolves in my Wolf Point series Misty based on one of the main characters in Unleashed.  (Another character is named Daniel, but he’s not named after the Daniel in this story).

 

#8: Frostbite by David Wellington

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One of the few true “horror” novels on this list, I had originally bought Overwinter (the second book in this two book series) before realizing I needed to read this one first.

There’s plenty of action as a woman named Cheyenne barely survives a wolf attack and is brought to a man named Powell for help.  When she learns Powell wants to kill her, she runs, and that is when she discovers that Powell is a werewolf, and so is she.

 

 

#7: Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer

49041You might think it silly, but I do think the werewolf culture presented in this series is strong and well-developed.  Yes, there has been controversy about this being cultural appropriation, but based on other instances of Native American culture in young adult literature, I find this to be one of the least problematic.

Jacob’s nature as a werewolf is only hinted at in the first book, and it’s New Moon where it becomes central to the plot.  New Moon is also where Edward is MIA and Jacob and Bella’s friendship begins to grow.  Jacob is literally the best part of New Moon, because he pulls Bella out of her months-long catatonia (or moping, as one might call it).

 

#6: Sharp Teeth by Toby Barlow

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The Alex Awards celebrate adult novels with young adult appeal, and I was a new YA librarian when I heard about this particular book on the list.

Essentially, Sharp Teeth is an epic poem.  Unlike Beowulf or The Odyssey or other epic poems teens are forced to read in high school, this one is about werewolves.  Werewolf poetry is rare, despite some of the earliest works about werewolves being poems (“Bisclavret” by Marie de France was written in the 12th century).  So you get to feel like you’re reading something literary, instead of pulpy.

 

#5: Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater

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This was the first book I ever read by Maggie Stiefvater and it made me a total convert.  Her writing is poetic without being over the top purple prose, and I loved the idea that these werewolves only changed when it got to be too cold.

I’ll admit that I read this shortly after reading Twilight, and there is a heavy focus on the romance.  But there’s no love triangle, and Grace and Sam are so sweet with each other.  Plus you get to hear both of their perspectives.  In later books, you get to hear from others in the pack, like Isabelle and Cole (who get their own book later in the series).

 

#4: Raised by Wolves by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

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You’ll hear me gush about Patricia Briggs later in this list, so it might not mean much now for me to say Jennifer Lynn Barnes is like the YA version of Patricia Briggs.

Bryn isn’t a werewolf, but she was raised by a werewolf alpha after he saved her from a werewolf attack.  And she has to work within the pack rules to figure out why everyone’s telling her to stay away from Chase, who was also attacked in a similar way as Bryn herself was.

Another bonus: this is a trilogy, not an endless series – although I would have gladly read more!

 

 

#3: Cry Wolf (and the entire Alpha & Omega series) by Patricia Briggs

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Just a note: I’d recommend reading the prequel novella “Alpha & Omega” (contained in the anthology On the Prowl) before reading the first book in this series.

Patricia Briggs has created a wonderfully complex world of werewolves.  Her other series explores the wider world – which includes fae, vampires, witches, and various other paranormal beings.  This series really focuses on werewolf politics and pack structure from the perspective of a werewolf alpha, Charles, seen by most of the werewolf community as an assassin, and Anna, a rare werewolf omega.

Omegas are so rare, in fact, that the pack who turned Anna believed she was simply the lowest of the low in pack order, when instead she’s actually outside the order.  This means Anna was abused in her pack, until Charles saves her.  And it’s their romance and the way they heal each other that makes this series so wonderful.

 

#2: Moon Called (and the entire Mercy Thompson series) by Patricia Briggs

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That’s right, another series by Patricia Briggs!

Don’t let this cover fool you.  This is the best werewolf series out there – and thankfully, the covers of the later books move away from the paranormal tramp-stamp aesthetic.

Patricia Briggs builds a fantastic world full of paranormal beings.  Mercy isn’t actually a werewolf, she’s a shapeshifter, but she ended up being raised by werewolves.  More specifically, she was raised by the Marrok, the head of all the werewolf packs in North America.  She is able to sense magic, and has ties to the werewolves through pack bonds, which makes her able to maneuver the many sticky situations she finds herself in.

There’s a ton of folklore in the history of the werewolves, which is explored in Shifting Shadows (a collection of the short stories and novellas based on this world). There’s also some romance, and realistic handling of things like rape and violence.  You don’t have to read this series to read the Alpha & Omega series, but it certainly helps.

The only reason I don’t have this series at the top of my list is because it did take me a while to get a feel for Briggs’ writing style.

 

#1: Blood & Chocolate by Annette Curtis Klause

30324This little book is my favorite werewolf novel.  Please, do not watch the movie (or, if you do, know that the movie bears very little resemblance to the book).  Published before the Twilight phenomenon, it’s a young adult story of a female werewolf, Vivian, who falls for a human boy.  What I really loved about this was that it didn’t hold back from exploring the savage lives of werewolves, where Vivian is expected to vie for the alpha’s attention (competing with her own mother), and she’s proud of what she is and expects the boy she loves to love her wolf form too. You’ll have to read it to find out how he reacts, but pretty much everything about this story surprised me.

 

There you have it!  My top ten favorite werewolf novels.  There were quite a few close calls – Hemlock Grove came thisclose to making the top 10, and I would have loved to add Sisters Red.  What is your favorite werewolf novel?